Epidemic Sound Hits Meta With $142M Lawsuit Over “Rampant Violation” Of Its Music On Facebook And Instagram

Sweden-based production music house Epidemic Sound has hit Facebook parent company Meta with a multimillion-dollar lawsuit over allegedly “stealing” “thousands” of its works.

In a lawsuit filed in California on Wednesday (July 20), Epidemic Sound claimed that its legal action is aimed at “stopping the theft of music created by hundreds of musicians, songwriters, producers and singers, where the theft knowingly arose.” , intentionally and brazenly carried out by Meta on its social media platforms Facebook and Instagram daily”.

Epidemic Sound is described in the filing as owning a “catalog of over 38,000 high quality musical works in over 160 genres for use in video content, television and film production, podcasts, music streaming platforms and other media.”

Founded in 2009 and led by co-founder and CEO Oscar Höglund, the company was valued at $1.4 billion last March when it raised a $450 million round of funding — including funds from investment giant Blackstone and EQT Growth.

As first reported by TorrentFreakThe Swedish music company claims that Meta “ignored Epidemic’s repeated reports of rights violations and requests for access to the tools that would help stop the rights violation”.

“Meta has refused to license Epidemic, even though Meta has done so with many other rightsholders.”

Epidemic sound

Adding Epidemic Sound in the lawsuit, “Meta has refused to license with Epidemic, even though Meta has done so with many other rightsholders.

“Maybe Meta hopes to get away with it for as long as possible. Perhaps Meta is hoping it will intimidate a company like Epidemic into bowing to Meta rather than incurring the disruptions and costs of litigation. Meta is wrong.”

Epidemic Sound also claims that Meta has “developed tools” on its social media platforms Facebook and Instagram whose “main purpose is to increase the number of thefts.”

According to the music company, Meta’s alleged “unlawful conduct” has resulted in more than “80,000 new cases of theft of Epidemic’s work per day.”

Elsewhere in the filing, Epidemic claims it learned that Meta “was storing, curating, reproducing and distributing Epidemic’s music without permission and offering Epidemic’s music for free without proper attribution or license.”

Epidemic claims that Meta offers its works through its own music library “to any of its users for free use, including downloading, streaming, or incorporation into video content, without a license or other permission.”

In the company’s lawsuit against Meta, Epidemic attempts to distinguish between alleged infringement by Meta and infringement by its users, claiming that “Meta wishes to believe” and “will no doubt tell this court” that the latter is true, not the former.

“These infringing uses aren’t just about users posting infringing works that Meta hasn’t removed,” Epidemic Sound claims, adding that the alleged “infringement is caused and committed by Meta itself.”

“In this case, the point is for Meta to create features that allow and encourage users to easily reproduce and dub Epidemic’s music without permission and without compensation to Epidemic, its songwriters and recording artists.”

Epidemic sound

Adds Epidemic Sound, “The point in this case is that Meta itself actively and directly violates Epidemic’s works by storing them in its online music library and then making a curated selection of Epidemic’s works available on its platforms.

“In this case, the point is for Meta to create features that allow and encourage users to easily reproduce and dub Epidemic’s music without permission and without compensation to Epidemic, its songwriters and recording artists.”

Epidemic further claims that “unauthorized use” of his works on Meta’s social platforms is “rampant.”

Epidemic says its music “is available in millions of videos and has been viewed billions of times” and that it believes “approximately 94% of the content that uses Epidemic’s music on Meta’s platforms is unlicensed and therefore infringing.”

The music company is seeking maximum statutory damages of $150,000 for each work it believes has been infringed, with the total damages sought being “not less” than $142 million.music business worldwide

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